Geboortetempel of mammisi

Moderator: yuti

Geboortetempel of mammisi

Berichtdoor Abusir » Ma Aug 13, 2007 12:37 pm

Woordje vooraf: de volgende bijdrage is de ingekorte Engelse versie van een Tsjechische lezing over de geboortetempels of mammisis.

The Birth Houses of Pharaonic, Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt

In the fourth century BC, when Pharaonic Egypt was drawing to an end and Persian troops were gathering at the borders of the land, a final surge of activity took place upon the many temple domains along the Nile. Pharaohs Nachtnebef (Nectanebo I, 380-364 BC) and Nachthareheb (Nectanebo II, 361-343 BC) of the 30th dynasty initiated, encouraged and financed the restoration and enlargement of older temples and the erection of new sanctuaries throughout the land. After a short hiatus, during which the Persians controlled Egypt (343-332 BC), the land fell into the hands of Alexander III the Great and his successors, a Greek-Macedonian royal house better known as the Ptolemaic dynasty (332-30 BC). In an attempt to secure the support of the mighty priesthoods and the acceptance of the local populace, the Ptolemies purposefully portrayed themselves as the legitimate successors of their native predecessors, the pharaohs of the 30th dynasty. One of the many ways in which they stepped into the footsteps of the Egyptian pharaohs was by lavishly contributing to the restoration and upkeep of the old temples, but also to the construction of many new sanctuaries throughout Egypt. The temples erected during the three centuries of Ptolemaic Egypt belong nowadays among the best preserved and largest temples ever erected in Egypt and include for instance the temple of the goddess Hathor at Dendara, the temple of the falcon god Horus at Edfu and the temple of the goddess Isis at Philae.

At this time a new type of construction, the so-called birth house, started to appear on more then a dozen of the larger temple domains. This is for instance the case at Medamud, Armant, Kom Ombo, Edfu, Philae, and Kalabsha. At Dendara not one but two birth temples were erected: one in the 30th dynasty and one during the Roman Empire.
http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... sisjh6.png

This new sanctuary is a very typical construction of the 30th dynasty, the Ptolemaic era and the first centuries of Roman Egypt. The modern term for this building, “birth house”, is directly derived from its ancient Egyptian name: per meset. Another term for the birth house, which is often found in Egyptological publications and guidebooks on Egypt, is “mammisi”. Although the noun “mammisi” probably ranks among the best known Coptic words, one would have a very had time trying to locate the term in a single Coptic text or inscription. The term “mammisi” is in fact a 19th century fabrication. It was none other than the decipherer of the hieroglyphs, French Egyptologist Jean-François Champollion (1790–1832), who translated the Egyptian term for this building, per meset, into the Coptic “mammisi”. And the term has stuck ever since.

The birth house or “mammisi” is a small temple that is located along the processional route, which leads from the entrance of the temple domain to the main temple. The oldest birth temples from the 30th dynasty, like the mammisi of pharaoh Nachtnebef at Dendara, are in general small constructions, which consisted only of a sanctuary with an antechamber or vestibule and a staircase to the roof. Since the antechamber was usually much wider than the sanctuary, the latter could be flanked by a series of side rooms and/or corridors. The sanctuary of the birth house of Nachtnebef at Dendara measures for instance 8m30 by 4.60, while the antechamber measures 4m60 by 11m20. The space on the south side of the sanctuary was filled with a staircase to the roof of the small temple, and the space to the north with a small side room.

In the Ptolemaic and Roman Period, the birth house was surrounded on all sides by an ambulatory with columns. This addition to the small temple gave it partly the look of a Greek peripteros temple, a temple on all sides surrounded by columns. The Egyptian birth houses differ from a true peripteros temple since the front side of the mammisi was almost never provided with a row of columns. The only exception appears to be the uninscribed birth house of Kalabsha from the reign of Roman emperor Augustus (30 BC–14 AD). The roof of the ambulatory was sometimes higher than the roof of the sanctuary it surrounded and this resulted in the creation of a sunken area or basin on the roof surface. The basin collected rainwater and it required a complicated drainage system to remove the water from the roof of the temple.

Birth house of Philae: http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... ae2lx7.jpg
Roman birth house of Dendara: http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... si2qa1.jpg

The columns surrounding the birth houses were interconnected by screen walls, as is for instance the case with the Roman birth house dedicated to the child god Harsomtus at Dendara. The screen wall is an architectural element that is very typical for the temples from the Ptolemaic and Roman period of Egypt. The front of the pronaos, a colonnaded hall added to the front of the main temple, was usually also formed by a row of columns interconnected by screen walls. The screen walls between the columns prevented everyone from looking inside the monument and probably originated with wooden, portable blinds that were used to subdivide areas in the temple according to cultic requirements. Examples of non–durable screen wall are already known from Old Kingdom depictions. The upper part of the screen wall often contained a frieze of uraei – a series of rearing cobras. The frieze of uraei had a protective function and was meant to keep danger outside the temple.
Screen wall: http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... allku8.jpg

The ancient Egyptian name of the building, per meset or “birth house”, already reveals a great deal about the role this smaller temple played within the temple precinct. The research of French Egyptologist Francois Daumas (1915–1984) in the fifties of the 20th century has been crucial for our understanding of the function this temple performed within the temple domain. In the mammisi the divine birth of the local child god and rightful heir to the throne of Egypt was commemorated and celebrated. On the numerous temple domains often a triad of deities — a father god, a mother goddess and a male child deity — were venerated. At Dendara the triad consisted for instance of the goddess Hathor, her husband Horus and their offspring Harsomtus. Harsomtus is the Greek version of the name of the child deity that is known in Egypt as “Horus who unites the two lands” (Hr sm3-t3.wy). The study of reliefs and inscriptions has revealed the existence of a close link between the child deity and the ruling pharaoh.

In the sanctuary of each birth house a series of 16 reliefs depicts the different phases in the divine conception and birth of the local child god. The set of reliefs from the 30th dynasty mammisi of Harsomtus at Dendara will be our guide in the following overview. In the first series of scenes the god Amun expresses to the other deities present his desire to have an heir to take his place on earth. After the other deities wholeheartedly agree with this idea, Amun sets several gods to work to create his offspring. The ram-headed Khnum models the child-god on his potter’s wheel, while the frog-headed goddess Heket holds the ankh-sign, the sign of life, to the nose of the child god.
http://img172.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... ketwc3.png
The goddess Hathor is then brought up to date of the intentions of her husband Amun by the gods Thoth and Khnum and led to the bedchamber, where the conception of the child deity takes place. While sitting together on the nuptial bed Amun presents the heavily pregnant Hathor with the ankh-sign of life to ensure a successful and safe birth.
http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?imag ... my2yi4.jpg
Hathor subsequently gives birth to the child in the company of gods who are known for their expertise in child-bearing, like Nekhbet and Mesyt (the goddess who personifies birth), or who ward of evil, like Bes. After the child god is acknowledged by Amun as his legitimate son and successor, the child is nursed by the divine cows Hesat and Sekhat-Hor. In the final series of scenes the child is provided with magical protection, placed upon the throne and his kingship over Upper and Lower Egypt is confirmed for eternity.

The 16 reliefs in the sanctuary of the birth house and the scenes upon the other walls of this construction, together with the calendars of festivals that can still be found upon the walls of many Ptolemaic temples, indicate that the divine birth of the local child god, the rightful heir of the throne of Egypt, and different stages in the life of the young deity were celebrated on several occasions throughout the year. These celebrations often also focused on the eternal renewal of the kingship, associated with the young deity. The feasts entailed processions from the main temple to the birth house and the occurrence of enactments on site, not unlike the nativity plays that take place in churches. The increasing number of processions and participants in the many ceremonies eventually increased the need for more space at the birth houses. In Ptolemaic and Roman times a colonnaded kiosk or a forecourt was therefore often added in front of the mammisi to enlarge the sacred area. At the birth house of Nachtnebef at Dendara, for instance, a kiosk was added, doubling the length of the construction from the previous 20m80 to 42m50. The mammisi of Harsomtus at Edfu received both a kiosk and a forecourt, and the construction was no less than 55m long and measured 20m at its widest point.
Edfu: http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?image=mammisiyd4.png

Although the birth temples are a typical occurrence on temple domains at the very end of Pharaonic Egypt and throughout the Ptolemaic and Roman period, its origin dates back at least to the 18th dynasty (cca 1543-1292 BC). The series of reliefs depicting the birth of the child god can among others be found in the temple of Hatshepsut (cca 1479-1457 BC) at Deir el-Bahari and the temple of Amenhotep III (cca 1387-1348 BC) in Luxor. In the 18th dynasty examples the scenes did not depict the birth of the child god, but the divine birth of the pharaoh himself. The mother of the pharaoh is on these scenes no longer a goddess but the queen! The offspring of the union between the god Amun and the queen, none other than the pharaoh himself, could thus claim to be of divine origin. An even older version of the divine birth is found on papyrus Westcar, where a tale is told of the divine birth of the first three pharaohs of the 5th dynasty. The original text dates to the Middle Kingdom (cca 1994–1797 BC), but is only preserved in later copies.

The change in the decorative scheme on the walls of the birth houses in between the New Kingdom (cca 1543-1080 BC) and the end of Pharaonic Egypt is an interesting example of how the ideas behind the divine origin of the ruler evolved over time, and how new circumstances resulted in an adaptation of a long tradition. In the New Kingdom, the reliefs leave no doubt that the native pharaoh was directly connected to the god Amun as his son and he received his authority and power directly from his father, the god. In the Late Period and beyond, when Egypt was ruled time and again by foreign powers, the reliefs depict how the god bestowed his authority no longer on the pharaoh – often a foreign ruler – but to a child deity, his son, instead. Since the pharaoh remained central to the Egyptian religious belief system and the well being of the Egyptian state, even when a foreigner was sitting on the throne of the two lands, many inscriptions and scenes inform us that the foreign ruler was associated with the child god and thus indirectly received the authority from Amun to rule over Egypt.

While the typical reliefs of the mammisis date back to the 18th dynasty, the birth temple itself might have been an architectural development from the Rammeside period (cca 1292-1080 BC). Unfortunately the forerunners of this temple type are now all lost and all that remains are the birth houses from the 30th dynasty and the Ptolemaic and Roman era on the temple precincts at Dendara, Kom Ombo, Edfu, Philae, Kalabsha and many other sites. Even today they still testify of the divine birth of the local deity and his right to the throne of the two lands.

Bibliografie
F. Daumas, Les mammisis des temples égyptiens, Paris 1958.
F. Daumas, Les mammisis de Dendara, Cairo 1959.
F. Daumas, „Geburtshaus“, in W. Helck – E. Otto (eds.), Lexikon der Ägyptologie II, Wiesbaden 1977.
D. Arnold, Temples of the Last Pharaohs, Oxford–New York 1999.
G. Haeny, “Peripteraltempel in Ägypten – Tempel mit Umgang”, in M. Bietak (ed.), Archaische Griechische Tempel und Altägypten, Wien 2001.
Abusir
 
Berichten: 95
Geregistreerd: Vr Apr 27, 2007 9:14 am
Woonplaats: Praag, Tsjechie

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Do Aug 16, 2007 1:06 am

Het is misschien idioot, maar sinds ik me een paar jaar geleden heel eventjes in de geschiedenis van de Middeleeuwen verdiepte – ik heb toen zelfs naar aanleiding van het lezen van ‘De waanzinnige veertiende eeuw’ van Barbara Tuchman mijn gezin meegesleept naar ‘le château de Coucy’ in Picardië (Fr) :D – blijft me de volgende gedachte bij:

Kan het afzonderlijke baptisterium bij ‘onze’ kathedralen of kerken een connectie hebben met het geboortehuis van het oude Egypte?

Ik dacht dat het eerste nog bestaande afzonderlijk baptisterium dateert van Constantijn (of van Sixtus III) … San Giovanni in Fonte te Rome?
http://members.tripod.com/Romeartlover/Vasi101.html
Niet te verwarren met het Baptisterium San Giovanni in Florence:
http://www.mega.it/eng/egui/monu/bc.htm

Ik heb me altijd afgevraagd waarom – sommige - baptisteria afzonderlijk van het kerkgebouw staan.
Op Wikipedia vond ik een interessante verwoording:
http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baptisterium
“De uitgebreide manier waarop de baptisteria versierd en gebouwd zijn wijst op de grote waarde die de christenen hechten aan het doopritueel. Het doopritueel symboliseert de intrede in een geloofsgemeenschap, het hoofd wordt besprenkeld met water (vroeger werd je geheel ondergedompeld) om je zonden af te wassen en je te zuiveren van de erfzonde. Na het ritueel ben je als lid van de kerk aangenomen, maar nog belangrijker: als kind van god.”

- Dus bij de baptisteria betekent het afzonderlijk gelegene wellicht dat de onzuivere mens het kerkgebouw pas binnenkwam na het zuiveren door het doopritueel. Maar er waren ook genoeg doopvonten in de kerk zelf.

- Waarom stond het geboortehuis in het oude Egypte dan afzonderlijk van de tempel? Gewoon een stenen weergave van een geboortepaviljoen?

Abusir schreef:
The feasts entailed processions from the main temple to the birth house and the occurrence of enactments on site, not unlike the nativity plays that take place in churches.

Wat moeten we ons voorstellen bij ‘enactments on site’ en wat zijn de bronnen hiervan?

Abusir schreef:
The change in the decorative scheme on the walls of the birth houses in between the New Kingdom (cca 1543-1080 BC) and the end of Pharaonic Egypt is an interesting example of how the ideas behind the divine origin of the ruler evolved over time, and how new circumstances resulted in an adaptation of a long tradition. In the New Kingdom, the reliefs leave no doubt that the native pharaoh was directly connected to the god Amun as his son and he received his authority and power directly from his father, the god. In the Late Period and beyond, when Egypt was ruled time and again by foreign powers, the reliefs depict how the god bestowed his authority no longer on the pharaoh – often a foreign ruler – but to a child deity, his son, instead. Since the pharaoh remained central to the Egyptian religious belief system and the well being of the Egyptian state, even when a foreigner was sitting on the throne of the two lands, many inscriptions and scenes inform us that the foreign ruler was associated with the child god and thus indirectly received the authority from Amun to rule over Egypt.


Heel interessant, bedankt om dit te posten Abusir :!: , en excuus voor de soms onmogelijke vragen.
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor Abusir » Vr Sep 21, 2007 10:26 am

Philip Arrhidaeus schreef: Kan het afzonderlijke baptisterium bij ‘onze’ kathedralen of kerken een connectie hebben met het geboortehuis van het oude Egypte? Waarom stond het geboortehuis in het oude Egypte dan afzonderlijk van de tempel? Gewoon een stenen weergave van een geboortepaviljoen?


Twee vragen die heel moeilijk te beantwoorden zijn, maar ik ga hier toch even een poging wagen. Het bestaan van een relatie tussen het baptisterium bij kathedralen en het geboortehuis bij de Egyptische tempel is heel moeilijk te bewijzen, maar misschien niet geheel onmogelijk. Er zijn genoeg andere voorbeelden van de invloed van oudegyptische kunst op de christelijke iconografie - beelden van Isis met Horus op de schoot hebben bijvoorbeeld als inspiratie gediend voor de beelden van Maria met kindje Jezus. En vele oudegyptische tempels hebben gedurende een korte of langere periode dienst gedaan als kerk. Er waren dus zeker raakvlakken tussen beide religies, maar dit zijn echter indirecte aanwijzingen en geen bewijzen.

We mogen ons ook niet laten misleiden door de terminologie. Het christelijk baptisterium en het egyptisch geboortehuis (pr-ms.t) lijken op het eerste zicht naar hetzelfde te verwijzen, maar dit is niet helemaal het geval. In het geboortehuis vierde men de geboorte van de kind-god (Harsomtus, Ihy, Harsiese,...) en zijn verdere ontwikkeling. De relatie tussen de kind-god en het koningschap (en de farao) komt eveneens vaak aan bod in de teksten en reliefs. De enige band met het baptisterium is dat het in beide gevallen handelt om een jong kind/kind-god, maar de rituelen staan toch een heel eind van mekaar. Dit sluit natuurlijk niet uit dat het geboortehuis model kan hebben gestaan voor het baptisterium. Onder ideale omstandigheden zou het natuurlijk heel leuk zijn om een geboortehuis te vinden dat nadien is omgebouwd tot een baptisterium - maar dit is bij mijn weten nooit vastgesteld.

De lokatie van het geboortehuis afzonderlijk van de tempel is een evolutie uit de Late Tijd en de Ptolemaisch en Romeinse periode. In de oudste voorbeelden van de scenes van de geboorte van de kind-god (in dit geval de goddelijke farao, zoon van Amun en de koningin) - in de Nieuwerijks tempels van Amenhotep III in Luxor en Hatsjepsoet in Deir el-Bahari, zijn deze scenes aangebracht in een kamer in de eigenlijke tempel. Het is pas in de later periode dat de geboortetempels met zekerheid afzonderlijk van de tempel verschijnen (er zijn hypothesen die suggereren dat reeds in de Ramessiedische periode de geboortetempel als afzonderlijke constructie zou hebben bestaan).

De vele feestkalenders uit de Ptolemaische en Romeinse periode tonen aan dat er veelvuldige processies plaatsvonden in de tempel, op het tempeldomein en zelfs buiten de tempel (de jaarlijkse processie van Hathor van Dendara naar Edfu bijvoorbeeld). Een van de meest populaire lokaties van deze processies was de geboortetempel. Tempels uit deze periode, met de vele omheiningsmuren en corridors langs de tempel, lijken bijzonder geschikt voor de organisatie van processies binnen en buiten (en zichtbaar en onzichtbaar voor de bevolking). Het beste voorbeeld is natuurlijk de tempel van Edfu. De evolutie van de geboortetempel tot een afzonderlijk gebouw staat misschien in verband met de toename aan processies in deze late periode van de oudegyptische geschiedenis.
Abusir
 
Berichten: 95
Geregistreerd: Vr Apr 27, 2007 9:14 am
Woonplaats: Praag, Tsjechie

Drama in het oude Egypte

Berichtdoor Abusir » Vr Sep 21, 2007 10:42 am

Philip Arrhidaeus schreef:Abusir schreef:
The feasts entailed processions from the main temple to the birth house and the occurrence of enactments on site, not unlike the nativity plays that take place in churches.

Wat moeten we ons voorstellen bij ‘enactments on site’ en wat zijn de bronnen hiervan?


Het onderwerp 'drama' is een heel gevoelig topic in de egyptologische wereld. Het bestaan van 'dramaturgische' voorstellingen op het tempeldomein, zoals bijvoorbeeld in de kiosk of open hof voor de geboortetempel, kent zijn vele voorstanders en tegenstanders. Theater, zoals wij het kennen, is in Egypte ongekend - tenminste op basis van de huidige teksten en reliefs die we ter onzer beschikking hebben. Een aantal teksten op papyri en op de muren van tempels worden echter omschreven als 'dramatische teksten'. Deze teksten, zoals de triomf van Horus over zijn vijanden in Edfu of het Khoiak-festival van Osiris in Abydos (Bremner-Rhind Papyrus I), geven de indruk van een soort 'drama'. In hoeverre deze episodes, aangebracht op de wanden van de tempel, ook werden uitgevoerd is heel moeilijk, alsniet onmogelijk, te beantwoorden. De egyptoloog Fairman was een groot voorstander van de theatrale uitvoering van rituelen en 'dramas' op het tempeldomein. Als ik me niet vergis heeft men aan de universiteit van Toronto (of elders in Canada?) ooit een egyptisch drama op basis van zijn onderzoek uitgevoerd. De resultaten van zijn onderzoek zijn echter nooit algemeen aanvaard geworden in de egyptologische gemeenschap.

De vele processies die in de loop van het jaar op en rond de tempeldomeinen plaatsvonden hadden ongetwijfeld een 'dramatische' functie. Voor vele egyptenaren vormden de processies die het tempeldomein verlieten vaak het enige moment dat ze in nauw contact konden komen met een van de goden (vanzelfsprekend 'verborgen' in een schrijn, vaak op een bark geplaatst). De processie in zichzelf, met de priesters, standaarddragers, offerandedragers en zo meer moet voor de gewone egyptenaar een zeer opmerkelijke gebeurtenis zijn geweest.
Abusir
 
Berichten: 95
Geregistreerd: Vr Apr 27, 2007 9:14 am
Woonplaats: Praag, Tsjechie

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Za Sep 22, 2007 12:33 pm

Abusir schreef:
De enige band met het baptisterium is dat het in beide gevallen handelt om een jong kind/kind-god, maar de rituelen staan toch een heel eind van mekaar. Dit sluit natuurlijk niet uit dat het geboortehuis model kan hebben gestaan voor het baptisterium. Onder ideale omstandigheden zou het natuurlijk heel leuk zijn om een geboortehuis te vinden dat nadien is omgebouwd tot een baptisterium - maar dit is bij mijn weten nooit vastgesteld.

Waarschijnlijk was het heel logisch dat de rituelen heel ver van elkaar stonden, want wat beter om een nieuwe godsdienst te creëren of stimuleren dan je volledig af te zetten tegen de oude gebruiken?
Toch vond ik de gelijkenis treffend in de gedachte 'kind van god'. En de eerste Christenen zullen misschien wel op de hoogte geweest zijn van de bedoeling van een mammisi?
Maar ik wil dit punt niet verdedigen ... het was enkel een gedachte.



Abusir schreef:
... er zijn hypothesen die suggereren dat reeds in de Ramessiedische periode de geboortetempel als afzonderlijke constructie zou hebben bestaan ...

In verband met de mogelijke mammisi in het Ramesseum:
viewtopic.php?t=931&mforum=prkmthetegyptef
En mogelijk oudere oorsprong:
viewtopic.php?t=939&mforum=prkmthetegyptef



Ausir schreef:
Het onderwerp 'drama' is een heel gevoelig topic in de egyptologische wereld.

Inderdaad, niet alleen gevoelig, maar ook geen makkelijke materie. Yuti schreef hierover:
viewtopic.php?t=741&mforum=prkmthetegyptef
Toch wekte jouw opmerking mijn interesse op:
... not unlike the nativity plays that take place in churches.




Abusir schreef:
Voor vele egyptenaren vormden de processies die het tempeldomein verlieten vaak het enige moment dat ze in nauw contact konden komen met een van de goden ...

Ik heb me al dikwijls afgevraagd of dit de gewone burger kon voldoen in zijn nood aan rituelen. Het zou me heel menselijk lijken dat er drama's uitgevoerd werden ten behoeve van het volk.
Misschien waren deze opvoeringen niet zozeer gestuurd door de staat, zodat er minder referenties naar overblijven?
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Re: Drama in het oude Egypte

Berichtdoor Abusir » Ma Sep 24, 2007 3:55 pm

Abusir schreef: Als ik me niet vergis heeft men aan de universiteit van Toronto (of elders in Canada?) ooit een egyptisch drama op basis van zijn onderzoek uitgevoerd.


Een verslag van dit 'drama' is te vinden in KMT: R. Gillam, Restaging 'The Triumph of Horus' or Hunting the Hippo in Toronto, KMT 11/1, 2000, p. 72-83.
Abusir
 
Berichten: 95
Geregistreerd: Vr Apr 27, 2007 9:14 am
Woonplaats: Praag, Tsjechie

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Zo Okt 07, 2007 11:25 pm

Abusir schreef:
De egyptoloog Fairman was een groot voorstander van de theatrale uitvoering van rituelen en 'dramas' op het tempeldomein.
...
...
Een verslag van dit 'drama' is te vinden in KMT: R. Gillam, Restaging 'The Triumph of Horus' or Hunting the Hippo in Toronto, KMT 11/1, 2000, p. 72-83.


Interessant en geeft aanleiding tot discussie.

Ik heb een nieuw onderwerp hierover gemaakt: 'De triomf van Horus in Edfoe'.
viewtopic.php?t=974&mforum=prkmthetegyptef
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Wo Nov 21, 2007 9:37 pm

Abusir schreef:
Er zijn genoeg andere voorbeelden van de invloed van oudegyptische kunst op de christelijke iconografie - beelden van Isis met Horus op de schoot hebben bijvoorbeeld als inspiratie gediend voor de beelden van Maria met kindje Jezus. En vele oudegyptische tempels hebben gedurende een korte of langere periode dienst gedaan als kerk. Er waren dus zeker raakvlakken tussen beide religies, maar dit zijn echter indirecte aanwijzingen en geen bewijzen.


Ben ik helemaal mee eens, maar ik zat de berichtenreeks nog eens te overlezen en ik wil nog even zeggen dat ik eigenlijk niet zozeer zoek achter gelijkenissen in geloof, maar naar evoluties in ideeën … en wat beter dan de architectuur te bekijken, die dikwijls de weergave is van ‘s mensens gedachtegoed.

In dit verband vond ik de opmerkingen van Dieter Arnold in ‘Temples of the Last Pharaohs’ (1999) p. 312 wel interessant.
Hij wijst naar een gelijkenis in de structuur van de Egyptische tempel en die van kerken, zoals
- de opbouw langs een lange centrale as
- het naar omhoog gaan naar het heilige der heiligen
- de vergelijking van het Egyptische baldakijn met het ciborium
- de naos omringende kapellen in vergelijking met de absiskapellen.
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor ancheperoere » Vr Nov 23, 2007 10:04 am

De kritische betweter weer terug! :wink:

vroegchristelijke en middeleeuwse architectuur is nu juist net mijn (beroepsmatige terrein).

In het vorige bericht wordt gesteld dat er een gelijkenis zou zijn in de structuur van de Egyptische tempel en die van kerken, zoals
1 de opbouw langs een lange centrale as
2 het naar omhoog gaan naar het heilige der heiligen
3 de vergelijking van het Egyptische baldakijn met het ciborium
4 de naos omringende kapellen in vergelijking met de absiskapellen.

ad 1: ik ken geen enkele tempel waar ook ter wereld die niet langs een of andere as is opgesteld. Zelfs die gebouwen die als centraalbouw zijn vormgegeven, kennen meestal op een of andere wijze wel een punt waarnaar alles zich richt, dus een centrale as. Dit is dus niet exclusief egyptisch of christelijk.
ad 2: idem, komt bij buitengewoon veel religieuze bouwwerken voor, in heel verschillende culturen, is niet exclusief egyptisch of christelijk.
ad 3: het altaarciborium uit de vroegchristelijke architectuur is overduidelijk afgeleid van het laat romeinse/vroeg christelijke decorum rond het keizerschap. Die link is uitvoerig beargumenteerd en beschreven. Ik zie geen enkele relatie in deze met de egyptische tempelbouw.
ad 4: de herleiding van de kooromgang met straalkapellen - ik neem aan dat je daar op doelt - is op zich een boeiend en lastig te herleiden fenomeen. Dit komt aan het begin van de 11e eeuw op in de middeleeuwse architectuur in west europa. Mogelijk dat deze architectuurvorm (mede) is afgeleid voor vroegchristelijke architectuur. De kooromgang kennen we immers al van de vroege 4e eeuwse basilica's die buiten de stadsmuren van Rome op de begraafplaatsen met veel Christenen zijn gebouwd. Straalkapellen lijken daarentegen een vinding van de west europese romaanse architectuur, hoewel er een vroeg christelijk voorbeeld is dat in dit verband waarschijnlijk wel zeer relevant is. Dit hangt samen met de bekende symbolische associatie van het altaar in kerken met het graf van Christus. Hier zou een verwijzing in kunnen zitten naar de Heilige Grafkerk in Jerusalem. Dit bouwwerk is door keizer Constantijn neergezet en is een centraalbouw (rond) met een omgang. Aan drie zijden van de omgang bevinden zich absissen. Deze structuur herhaald zich ook in het mausoleum van Constantia, de huidige Santa Constanza in Rome. Dit monument is gebouwd voor de dochter van keizer Constantijn. Ook hier komen we de omgang met een drietal grote absiden tegen. Door de bouwvorm van de romeinse basilica/audientiezaal/triclinium te combineren met de halve Helige grafkerk krijg je een lang bouwwerk met een kooromgang en drie absiden of straalkapellen. Dit is exact de vorm die de eerste romaanse kerken met omgang en straalkapellen hebben. De afleiding van de Heilige Grafkerk in Jerusalem is dus vrij evident. Je zou wel kunnen denken, maar in de 11e eeuw was het Heilige Land niet langer in christelijke handen. Dat klopt, maar de christelijke pelgrimage naar Jerusalem is eigenlijk vanaf de arabische veroveringen in het tweede kwart van de 7e eeuw vrijwel ongestoord gecontinueerd. Uit zowel architectonische voorbeelden in de periode tussen ca. 300 n.Chr. tot ca. 1000 n.Chr. als uit (plattegrond) tekeningen en beschrijvingen weten we dat de Heilige Grafkerk in West Europa zeer goed bekend was. Karel de Grote heeft een van zijn naaste hoffunctionarissen Alcuin ooit naar Jerusalem gestuurd om opmetingen te doen aan o.m. de Heilige Grafkerk en de 'tempel van Salomo', de koepelmoskee die vervolgens zijn verwerkt in de paltskapel in Aken. Tenslotte is het gat tussen de romaanse 11e eeuwse architectuur en de oud egyptische architectuur - ruim 800 jaar - niet te overbruggen omdat er geen architectonische voorbeelden, tekeningen of beschrijvingen zijn die dit gat kunnen overbruggen.

Het is natuurlijk niet verkeerd om vergelijkingen te trekken, het lastige is dat voor je het weet zoiets tot 'feit' wordt verheven. Vergelijkingen kun je niet alleen op twee voorbeelden baseren, je moet ook veel breder kijken of een bepaald geconstateerd fenomeen niet ook elders voorkomt. Dan pas kun je goed beoordelen of een hypothese 'hout snijdt'. Voorbeeld: als je een rode anjer hebt en een rode roos, mag je niet constateren dat alle bloemen dus rood zijn. En dat is wel wat met deze vergelijking gebeurd!

De herleiding van de vroegchristelijke kerkgebouwen uit de laatantieke keizerlijke architectuur - ik denk aan paleisbasilica's, hele paleisarchitectuur is duidelijk gedocumenteerd en bewezen. Ik heb in dat verband nog nooit een oud egyptisch voorbeeld gezien ...
ancheperoere
 
Berichten: 250
Geregistreerd: Do Jan 11, 2007 3:18 pm

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Vr Nov 23, 2007 10:07 pm

Ik vind jou absoluut geen betweter en ben blij dat je hierop reageert.

Ancheperoere schreef:
ad 1: ik ken geen enkele tempel waar ook ter wereld die niet langs een of andere as is opgesteld. Zelfs die gebouwen die als centraalbouw zijn vormgegeven, kennen meestal op een of andere wijze wel een punt waarnaar alles zich richt, dus een centrale as. Dit is dus niet exclusief egyptisch of christelijk.


Je kunt zeer goed gelijk hebben; ik heb niet nagegaan of alle tempels een ‘ideologische as’ hebben, maar ik bedoelde een architecturale centrale as, met opeenvolging van verschillende structuren op dezelfde lijn.
(Ik had het nog niet eens over de gelijkenis van de gevel van een kathedraal met een pyloon. :wink: )

ad 3: het altaarciborium uit de vroegchristelijke architectuur is overduidelijk afgeleid van het laat romeinse/vroeg christelijke decorum rond het keizerschap. Die link is uitvoerig beargumenteerd en beschreven. Ik zie geen enkele relatie in deze met de egyptische tempelbouw.


Zoals je weet had ik het over de gelijkenis tussen het ciborium
http://www.stnicholascenter.org/stnic/i ... ium-lg.jpg
http://www.hago.org.uk/venue/st-philips ... terior.jpg
http://www.on-stein.nl/homepage/images/ ... 74%20v.jpg
en het Egyptische baldakijn
http://toetanchamon.tripod.com/images_t ... nd_zww.jpg
(kopiëren en plakken)
http://toetanchamon.tripod.com/images_toet/ow_uit5.gif
(kopiëren en plakken)
http://www.globalegyptianmuseum.org/ima ... 00x800.jpg

Indien de vroegchristelijke architectuur zich liet inspireren op het Romeinse decorum rond het keizerschap, wat meer dan waarschijnlijk is, waar liet het Romeinse decorum rond het keizerschap zich op inspireren?

Tenslotte is het gat tussen de romaanse 11e eeuwse architectuur en de oud egyptische architectuur - ruim 800 jaar - niet te overbruggen omdat er geen architectonische voorbeelden, tekeningen of beschrijvingen zijn die dit gat kunnen overbruggen.


De afleiding [van de straalkapellen] van de Heilige Grafkerk in Jerusalem is dus vrij evident.


Dat laatste kan zeer goed zijn, maar waarom kan de Heilige Grafkerk ook niet architecturaal geïnspireerd zijn op oudere gebouwen ?

Worden de teruggevonden straalkapellen in de Basilique St.-Martin te Tours (Fr.) niet als de oudste beschouwd? Ik bedoel dan in de resten van de heropbouw uit de 11de eeuw. (En toch mogelijk niet uit het oorspronkelijke heiligdom uit de 5de eeuw, vernietigd door de Noormannen?) Ik meende me dit te herinneren van deze zomer toen Tours op het menu stond, maar we zijn er niet geraakt wegens te veel te zien in de streek rond Angers.

Toch heeft Dieter Arnold het over gelijkenissen in kerkarchitectuur uit de 6de eeuw. In ‘Temples of the Last Pharaohs’, p. 312 schrijft hij:
“The assemblage of chapels of visiting or minor gods around the shrine of the lord of the Egyptian temple has an amazing analogy in Christian churches since the sixth century in the ring-shaped crypts and radiating chapels of the ambulatory along the apse.”
En hij verwijst hiervoor – jammer genoeg zonder voorbeelden te geven - in voetnoot naar: Kenneth J. Conant ‘Carolingian and Romanesque Architecture', 3rd ed. (London 1973), figs 28-29.

Moeten twee periodes overbrugd worden door ondertussen opgetrokken identieke bouwstructuren om een link te hebben? De westerse Egyptomanie uit de 19de eeuw heeft ook duidelijke linken met het oude Egypte.

. . . . . . . . . . .

Nog een gelijkenis, waarover jij beter kunt oordelen of het te ver gezocht is:
op p. 313 van hetzelfde boek van Dieter Arnold staat een foto uit de Santa Maria Assunta di Torcello van zuilen met een halfhoge muur ertussenin … wat heel sterk doet denken aan de Egyptische schermmuur – screen wall.
Ik zocht tevergeefs op het net een foto van het interieur van die kerk. Indien iemand dit wil zien, zal ik later eens beter zoeken – nu niet wegens niet veel tijd – of de foto uit het boek posten wanneer het niet anders kan.

. . . . . . . . . . .

Ik moet hier nog aan toevoegen dat ik echt niet op zoek ben naar een gelijkenissen tussen oud-Egyptisch geloof en Christendom.
Die discussie wil ik zelfs eigenlijk niet aangaan want dit is er de plaats niet voor.

Ik was enkel op zoek naar gelijkenissen in architectuur.
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor ancheperoere » Za Nov 24, 2007 11:26 pm

Ach als randverschijnsel kan een opmerking in dit forum wel, al ben ik het met je eens dat dit niet de plaats is om vroeg-christelijke architectuur te bespreken. als het gaat om wijze van argumenteren, kan een voorbeeld denk ik wel gebruikt worden.

Tenslotte nog dit:
1. Muren tussen zuilen komen regelmatig voor in middeleeuwse architectuur
2. Conant is zeer verouderd en
3. bij de egyptomanie in de 19e eeuw greep men bewust terug naar iets dat men kende, boeiend vond en in de mode was, vooral nadat de Description was gepubliceerd na Napoleon's expeditie in Egypte. Men kende dus de voorbeelden en had de oud egyptische cultuur herontdekt. Daar is in de middeleeuwen geen sprake van. Het gat van ruim 800 jaar is zonder een duidelijke link niet te overbruggen.

Daar laat ik het hier bij. Ik zit nu te broeden op de lege cartouches, wat in verband met dit forum veel interessanter is ... :welldone:
ancheperoere
 
Berichten: 250
Geregistreerd: Do Jan 11, 2007 3:18 pm

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Zo Nov 25, 2007 5:32 pm

Ancheperoere schreef:
... al ben ik het met je eens dat dit niet de plaats is om vroeg-christelijke architectuur te bespreken

Neenee Ancheperoere, begrijp me aub niet verkeerd. Ik schreef:
Ik moet hier nog aan toevoegen dat ik echt niet op zoek ben naar gelijkenissen tussen oud-Egyptisch geloof en Christendom.
Die discussie wil ik zelfs eigenlijk niet aangaan want dit is er de plaats niet voor.
Ik was enkel op zoek naar gelijkenissen in architectuur.
Waarmee ik wil vermijden dat iemand de indruk zou krijgen dat ik zijn/haar geloofsovertuiging aan wil vallen of de originaliteit van zijn/haar geloof in twijfel wil trekken.

Als je begrijpt wat ik bedoel ... daarover vermijd ik een polemiek, omdat geloof nu eenmaal ... een kwestie van geloven is.

De uitdrukking van geloof in architectuur of de evolutie van architectuur is een andere kwestie, en daarover kan - hoop ik - zonder dat iemand geloofsovertuiging gekwetst wordt, gediscussieerd worden.

Conant is zeer verouderd

Dieter Arnold verwijst ook naar artikels van Peter Grossmann (indien iemand geïnteresseerd kan ik de titels doorgeven) "A careful analysis by Pter Grossmann shows that inclined exterior walls ans flat roofs of Egyptian churches are typical Egyptian phenomena."

Het gat van ruim 800 jaar is zonder een duidelijke link niet te overbruggen.

Daarom was ik zoek gegaan naar grondplannen en beschrijvingen van de kathedraal van Hermopolis uit 430-440 na Chr., de kerk te Deir el-Abyad 440 na Chr. en St. Menas te Abu Mina uit dezelfde periode.
Maar jij kent dat beter dan ik om hierover te oordelen, want ik weet en vind er niet zoveel over.

Muren tussen zuilen komen regelmatig voor in middeleeuwse architectuur

Klopt, maar dit voorbeeld, zoals reeds vermeld in de Santa Maria Assunta di Torcello, ong. 1008 na Chr., vind ik treffend.

Afbeelding

Nu, ik heb het niet over één bepaalde gelijkenis, maar de som van de voorbeelden (en Dieter Arnold vermeld er nog zo wat, zoals het gebruik van de cavetto cornice (de holle kroonlijst) en de kubusvormige kapitelen bovenaan de zuilen in Egyptische kerken.

Het zou mij eigenlijk verwonderen dat de vroeg-Christelijke architectuur geen voorbeelden meegenomen heeft uit Egypte, wegens zijn nauwe verbondenheid met dit land.

Ik zit nu te broeden op de lege cartouches

Ik kijk er naar uit.
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor ancheperoere » Zo Nov 25, 2007 10:36 pm

ik ben het met je eens (en met Arnold) dat er zeker zaken zijn die vanuit de oud-egyptische architectuur zijn over genomen in de vroeg-christelijke architectuur van Egypte. als je de vroegchristelijke architectuur van Rome bekijkt, die toch wel heel bepalend is voor wat later in West Europa wordt gebouwd, of zelfs in Constantinopel, lijkt een eventuele egyptische invloed op de architectuur nihil. De overeenkomst van de afsluitende wanden tussen de zuilen is misschien een frappant voorbeeld van een vergelijkbare architectonische ontwikkeling als in de vroeg-christelijke architectuur, maar het lastige is dat het niet te bewijzen is dat er een verband tussen bestaat (het gaat mij natuurlijk niet alleen om dit voorbeeld). Hetzelfde argument zou gelden als ik stel dat er een band tussen egypte en de precolombiaanse culturen moet hebben bestaan omdat beide culturen gebruik hebben gemaakt van de piramide. De afstand en de tijd is te groot om te overbruggen, althans zo zie ik het!

Waar het mij niet om gaat is iemand te overtuigen van mijn visie of iemand van zijn geloofsovertuiging af te brengen. Dat is niet aan mij en zou arrogant zijn om dat te willen. Waar het mij wel om gaat, is als ik een stelling zie, ik daar soms graag inhoudelijk op reageer. Misschien wat te nadrukkelijk waardoor het kennelijk wat scherp overkomt, maar ook hopelijk prikkelt! Gaat mij puur om de inhoudelijikheid van de discussie en discussie is toch het hoogste doel van een forum zoals dit?
ancheperoere
 
Berichten: 250
Geregistreerd: Do Jan 11, 2007 3:18 pm

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Di Nov 27, 2007 12:59 am

Ancheperoere schreef:
Waar het mij niet om gaat is iemand te overtuigen van mijn visie of iemand van zijn geloofsovertuiging af te brengen. Dat is niet aan mij en zou arrogant zijn om dat te willen.

Ik legde nadruk op het verschil tussen een inhoudelijke discussie geloof en architectuur voor dezelfde redenen, èn omdat ik wou vermijden iemand (ook jij) voor het hoofd te stoten.
Wat eigenlijk niet nodig was in jouw verband, want je denkt er dus hetzelfde over. :)
Indien ik iets te nadrukkelijk geweest ben met nadruk te leggen op dit verschil, het was niet mijn bedoeling jou terecht te wijzen of iets in die richting.

Waar het mij wel om gaat, is als ik een stelling zie, ik daar soms graag inhoudelijk op reageer. Misschien wat te nadrukkelijk waardoor het kennelijk wat scherp overkomt, maar ook hopelijk prikkelt!

Ik vond je helemaal niet te nadrukkelijk en voor mij kwam je niet scherp over. Toch bedankt dat je dit duidelijk wilt maken.
Dat scherp of verkeerd overkomen, daar zit ik in verband met mijn berichtjes soms ook wel eens over in. Emoticons kunnen wel wat verduidelijken, maar geschreven discussies/conversaties geven weinig ruimte aan het verduidelijken van finesses in gevoelens of bedoelingen.

Gaat mij puur om de inhoudelijkheid van de discussie en discussie is toch het hoogste doel van een forum zoals dit?

Vollédig mee akkoord.

... als je de vroegchristelijke architectuur van Rome bekijkt, die toch wel heel bepalend is voor wat later in West Europa wordt gebouwd, of zelfs in Constantinopel, lijkt een eventuele egyptische invloed op de architectuur nihil.

Da's natuurlijk een ander paar mouwen ... om mee akkoord te gaan bedoel ik. :lol:
Zonder dat ik hier specialist in ben - en graag toegegeven: nog steeds op zoek - denk ik dat wegens de betrokkenheid van Rome en Constantinopel met Egypte, de vroege Egyptomanie in Rome, de voorchristelijke Egyptische godsdienstige invloed op Rome, en Egypte als verbonden met het vroege Christendom ... er hierdoor alleen al een invloed in gedachten en stijlen geweest kan zijn.
Gebruikers-avatar
Philip Arrhidaeus
Site Admin
 
Berichten: 6379
Geregistreerd: Do Mrt 23, 2006 3:16 pm
Woonplaats: Vlaanderen

Berichtdoor william » Di Nov 27, 2007 1:30 am

Niet alleen een invloed van gedachten en stijlen maar ook een overdracht van een aantal zeer herkenbare rituelen en beeldspraak.

vb. -het reinigingsritueel en het doopsel (wat ook een reinigingsritueel is)
-de scheppingsmythe van Choem (schiep de mens uit klei) en de schepping van Adam
-enz.

Zonder daarom het verschil in inhoudelijkheid in twijfel te trekken.

Hieruit kan je opmaken dat er toch een zekere continuïteit was in overdracht van religieuze ideeën dus waarom dan niet in bouwstijlen.
william
 
Berichten: 268
Geregistreerd: Wo Okt 17, 2007 4:32 pm
Woonplaats: Lochristi

Volgende

Terug naar Ptolemaeïsche en Romeinse perioden

Wie is er online?

Gebruikers in dit forum: Geen geregistreerde gebruikers en 2 gasten

cron