Verschillende vormen van Isis.

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Verschillende vormen van Isis.

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Di Mei 20, 2008 6:44 pm

Een mooi beeldje van Isis-Aphrodite ... staat ook in 'The complete Gods and Godesses of Ancient Egypt' van Richard H. Wilkinson p. 149.

Men liet er geen twijfel over bestaan dat het om een liefdesgodin ging.

Dit gracieuze terracotta beeldje van 14,4 cm hoog
http://www.gko.uni-leipzig.de/fileadmin ... /img26.jpg
bevindt zich in het Ägyptisches Museum, Leipzig
http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~egypt/Museum.htm

Wat is eigenlijk nog Egyptisch aan dit beeldje - dat wel uit Egypte komt?
Stand van de benen, haar ... alles Grieks.

Maar er is geen twijfel aan de Egyptische connectie: de koehoorns met de zonneschijf en de twee pluimen boven het hoofd.

Zou de knoop in de linten van de jurk verwijzen naar de Isis-knoop?
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Isis - Aphrodite

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Zo Jun 14, 2015 8:09 pm

Isis-Aphrodite in het Museo Egizio van Turijn:
Cat.7217/01-02

Afbeelding
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Isis - Thermoethis

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Zo Jun 14, 2015 8:40 pm

Isis Thermoethis / Isis Thermuthis / Isis Thermouthis

Twee foto's van een "levensgroot" standbeeld in het museum van Ostia Antica bij Rome, met detail van de slang.
Museumnummer inv. 18141, grijze marmer, 2de eeuw na Christus, uit het Iseum van Portus (het havendistrict),
op het bordje van het museum stond (in 2011): " Iside Pharia (met een vraagteken)"
http://www.ostia-antica.org/

Afbeelding

Afbeelding

In het Louvre.
E 20750, terracotta, ongeveer 20 cm hoog denk ik.
E 11759 en E 14225, kalksteen, miniatuur vuuraltaar met Isis Thermoethis in naos.
( vuuraltaren: viewtopic.php?f=30&t=2759 )

Afbeelding
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Re: Verschillende vormen van Isis.

Berichtdoor Rozette » Di Jul 28, 2015 6:50 pm

Philip schreef :
" Iside Pharia (met een vraagteken)"


Een recente studie door Susan Wood toont inderdaad aan dat het niet mogelijk is met zekerheid het beeld te identificeren met Isis.
Isis of niet het is gewoonweg een schitterend beeld, het kleine museum te Ostia bevat meerdere van deze prachtige beelden :D !!!!!!!!!!!!
Foto : Ostia juni 2015

Afbeelding
Women in Action: A Statue of Minor and Its Contexts
Author(s): Susan Wood
Source: American Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 119, No. 2 (April 2015), pp. 233-259
Quote;

Excavations in 1969 at the Isola Sacra of Ostia brought to light a bigio morato torso, again with cuttings for the attachment of head, arms, and feet. The statue, in its present form, is more than 2 m tall and therefore significantly over-life-sized. The scale, combined with the figure’s dramatic movement, would have given her a powerful effect: she strides forward, planting her left foot on some raised object while flexing her right leg slightly and turning the right foot outward, as though to brace and balance herself. The cutting for the attachment below the left foot indicates a wedgeshaped support that tapered upward to an apex just in front of the foot—the shape, in other words, of a ship’s prow. The statue wears a diaphanous chiton and, over it, a himation that hangs to the ankles. The upper left corner of the mantle falls forward over the chest, where it is tied in place with a thick roll of fabric around the torso, just below the breasts. This improvised belt appears to be a separate piece of fabric from the himation, which passes under it in both front and back. Perhaps we are to imagine that the subject has removed a veil from her head and pressed it into service as a belt during a rapid and windy voyage, since the ends of the twisted fabric flutter outward on each side. The himation covers the back of the figure but flares apart around the legs, while the wind blows the chiton back against the body. As does the goddess of the Perge type, the figure has belted the chiton with two narrow, cylindrical cords worn low on the abdomen. Damage to the statue unfortunately has obscured the nature of the fastening. But although the costume bears comparison with the Perge type, the pose, with its powerful lunge forward and upward, is strikingly different. Furthermore, the roll of drapery around the chest girds the figure for action and secures the garments in place. The mantle does not drape loosely from the forearms and across the back, as does that of the Perge Dancer. These statues belong to the same stylistic family, but the Ostia statue is no mere variant of the Perge type. Zevi’s proposed identification of the figure as Isis Pelagia, the legendary inventor of navigation and protector of seafarers, has an obvious appeal in light of the statue’s provenance. Ostia owed its existence not only to the sea but also specifically to the grain shipments from Egypt on which Rome depended. An Egyptian goddess of navigation and divine protector of sailors could hardly be more at home than near the harbor of such a city. Epigraphic evidence indicates that there was indeed a shrine of Isis near the findspot of the statue, although we cannot be certain whether the building where the statue came to light was in fact that shrine. Furthermore, the stance and windswept drapery recall the figure of Isis on many coins and votive plaques that depict the goddess creating the first sail. Isis Pelagia uses her own mantle for the purpose, usually pinning down the lower edge with her foot while holding the corners of the upper edge in front of her to catch the breeze. At least two more extant statues show a draped goddess in the same lunging movement, although their drapery differs both from each other and from that of the Ostia statue.
Therefore, we can speak not of a type but of a general format, if all these statues do indeed represent Isis. The Ostia statue in its present condition has no identifying attributes. None of the garments shows the distinctive fringe, and the himation is not fastened in the Isis knot, although these attributes did not necessarily appear when the goddess was identified with a Graeco-Roman deity. The statue did, however, have significant company. Another sculpture in bigio morato from the same building represents a huge bearded serpent. The Agathos Daimon of Alexandria commonly takes this form and frequently accompanies images of Isis and Serapis. As Bruneau pointed out, however, there are problems with the identification of any statue as Isis Pelagia. No statue thus far discovered preserves any trace of the sail that the goddess holds in the twodimensional representations. Fragments should at least survive under the foot with which the goddess holds down the lower edge of the cloth. If a statue of Isis held a sail in front of her, furthermore, the sheet of fabric would obscure the frontal view of her body. Yet this seems to be one of the Ostia statue’s two principal viewpoints; the other is the right profile. The sculptor has carefully rendered the folds of the chiton that reveal the forms of the breasts and abdomen. The left flank and rear of the statue, in contrast, are only summarily finished, probably because those sides faced a wall or niche. Furthermore, the Isis Pelagia on coins and reliefs plants both feet on the same groundline rather than stepping up onto the prow of the ship. If the figure’s pose is the primary basis for her recognition, then we should not lightly dismiss such a major discrepancy between the images in the minor arts and the monumental statue. That the statue wears a himation does not necessarily rule out the identification with Isis Pelagia, who occasionally wears one mantle around her shoulders while converting another garment—perhaps the long veil that she would normally wear over her head—into a sail. Die cutters and relief sculptors could then use the billowing himation behind her shoulders to indicate the speed of her forward movement. Of course, the following wind that inflates her impromptu sail should also be blowing her drapery forward rather than back, but the visual conventions for rapid movement read clearly enough, despite their failure to comply with the laws of physics. The Ostia statue, however, wears the mantle tied firmly around the chest, using the veil to secure it in place. There are no garments left over to use for a sail, and the himation does not billow behind the figure. Since the identity of the statue as Isis presents problems, perhaps other possible iconographic subjects should be considered. Other deities besides Isis are sometimes depicted alighting on the prows of ships. A spectacular example is the Nike of Samothrace. Although the Isis of Ostia is wingless, Gregarek argues for an identification as Isis-Nike. However, perhaps the statue represents another deity crucial to navigation, an Aura, as Cascella has suggested for the statue of Matidia Minor.Again, the dark stone could add a syncretic allusion to Isis, with whom the Aurae collaborate to speed ships on their journeys. And finally, it is possible that the head was a portrait, either of some local benefactor or of an Augusta.
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Re: Verschillende vormen van Isis.

Berichtdoor Philip Arrhidaeus » Vr Apr 15, 2016 8:37 pm

Over Renenoetet en Isis-Thermoethis...

Journal of Intercultural and Interdisciplinary Archaeology ( JIIA ) 2015
"Renenutet/Isis Thermouthis: diffusion of this anguiform deity from east to west"
Editors: Antonella D'Ascoli, Marco Baldi

De artikels zijn afzonderlijk af te halen:
http://journals.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/in ... 00/showToc
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